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Here’s the newest salvo in the Netflix/Verizon fight that blew up yesterday: Verizon is now threatening Netflix with legal action over the messages that Netflix is showing some Verizon subscribers, which blame Verizon for low-quality video streams.

Verizon’s cease and desist letter, sent to Netflix counsel David Hyman from Verizon attorney Randal Milch, is at the bottom of this post. It’s pretty self-explanatory.

Key excerpt: “Verizon demands that Netflix immediately cease and desist from providing any such further ‘notices’ to users of the Verizon network. We further demand that within five days from the date of this letter that Netflix provide Verizon with any and all evidence and documentation that it possesses substantiating Netflix’s assertion to Yuri Victor [the Vox journalist who kicked off the fight earlier this week by tweeting an image of Netflix's message] that his experience in viewing a Netflix video was solely attributable to the Verizon network, and that Netflix also provide a list of all Netflix customers … to whom Netflix has delivered such messages.”

Netflix’s response, via spokesman Jonathan Friedland: “This is about consumers not getting what they paid for from their broadband provider. We are trying to provide more transparency, just like we do with the ISP Speed Index, and Verizon is trying to shut down that discussion.”

Remember: Verizon and Netflix are partners, following an April pact that’s supposed to make it easier for Netflix to get its videos to Verizon subscribers.

Letter to David Hyman.pdf




6 comments
RAYRAY
RAYRAY

The Truth Always Comes Out Another Kink In Their Armour....I Hate To See If These Greedy Corporations Win The Internet Neutrality Debate...Geezzz

jsmithepa
jsmithepa

Why isn't there is a law against false advertisement with carriers? Do ANYBODY here getting what they paid (and promised) for?

Jreid
Jreid

It most likely is Verizon's fault.  Their customer reps always say the same thing.  The problem is in your home.  It's amazing though that even if I do nothing to the equipment in my house, the service comes back after a few hours (days).

Alan
Alan

Truth hurts, I know.

Geomancer
Geomancer

@Jreid 

Actually it isn't, I have FiOS and what they say is true. I get faster speeds than I pay for, even during peak hours. I get consistently 24 Mbps rather than the 15 Mbps advertised for my plan.

Netflix gives me these same messages during the evening. I can exit out of Netflix and go download something and still get the 3 MB/s (3 MB/s = 24 Mbps) that I've come to expect.


I can also go to YouTube and view videos set at 1080p without buffering issues.

lomsey
lomsey

@Geomancer


Actually, ISPs, have the ability to prioritize and filter traffic. Don't forget they can look at packet and decide how fast to route them. This is what is basically happening. The 24Mbps you are reading is not what you will get when it comes to getting netflix traffic.


This is very similar to how some ISP throttle bittorent traffic when they want to, providing they can identify it.

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