Qualcomm on Monday is announcing two new high-end chips with a host of high-end features, including support for ultra-high-definition video, 64-bit processing and LTE Advanced networks.

The Snapdragon 808 and 810 chips, which won’t show up in products until early 2015, complete the bulk of Qualcomm’s shift to 64-bit support, although Android itself has yet to make the move to 64 bits. Qualcomm, which at one point downplayed the need for 64-bit processors, nonetheless began adding 64-bit support with the December introduction of the Snapdragon 410.

The main difference between the two chips is that the 810 has added graphics horsepower to support 4K displays, while the 808 can power displays up to 2K (2560 pixels by 1600 pixels). The Snapdragon 808 has six CPU cores, while the 810 features eight processing cores.

“These product announcements, in combination with the continued development of our next-generation custom 64-bit CPU, will ensure we have a tremendous foundation on which to innovate as we continue to push the boundaries of mobile computing performance in the years to come,” Qualcomm executive VP Murthy Renduchintala said in a statement.

Qualcomm has been the leader in the high-end market, dominating the landscape for premium Android phones and tablets, though Samsung, Nvidia, Intel and others are all nipping at its heels.



2 comments
TechCheck
TechCheck

“I think they are doing a marketing gimmick. There’s zero benefit a consumer gets from that.” Anad Chandrasekher, Qualcomm executive.


"Predominantly... you need it for memory addressability beyond 4GB. That’s it. You don’t really need it for performance, and the kinds of applications that 64-bit get used in mostly are large, server-class applications" - Anad Chandrasekher, Qualcomm executive.


So basically can we expect that Qualcomm's chips are going to deliver no real benefit to end users as their high level execs seem to be singularly minded that 64-bit is only for a larger memory pool.


Meanwhile, for the curious, here is the AnandTech article which [other than having a clue] details various benefits of 64 bit architecture with a view of the Apple A7.


http://www.anandtech.com/show/7335/the-iphone-5s-review/4

ViewRoyal
ViewRoyal

But Android users have been saying that 64-bit processors are just a "marketing gimmick". Surely they can't be wrong! ;-))